Wildlife Act Phase 2 Regulations

What are the Wildlife Act Phase 2 regulations?

New regulations to protect wildlife in the NWT came into force under the Wildlife Act on July 1, 2019. Known as ‘Phase 2’ regulations, they are the second set of major regulatory amendments to the Act, and the result of three years of extensive consultation and collaboration with Indigenous governments and organizations, renewable resources boards, hunters, industry and tourism groups, as well as the public.

The new regulations address issues raised during the development of the Wildlife Act, including:

  • The import of harmful species, such as mule and white-tailed deer, llamas, alpacas, domestic sheep and domestic goats
  • Additional habitat protection for bats and raptors
  • The declaration of wild pigs as a pest species
  • Conservation of boreal caribou
  • Young harvesters from outside the NWT who want to go hunting with only a guide
  • Wildlife management and monitoring by industry

Guidelines have also been prepared to support the regulations for Wildlife Management and Monitoring Plans and provide clear expectations for developers on how to minimize impacts on wildlife and wildlife habitat.

Llamas, alpacas, domestic sheep & domestic goats

These regulations are intended to protect wild sheep and bison in the NWT from disease.

  • Llamas, alpacas, domestic sheep and domestic goats are not allowed in mountain areas west of the Mackenzie River.
  • A domestic animal permit is required for domestic sheep owners in Wood Bison Areas and anyone transporting domestic sheep in these areas.

Mackenzie Mountain Area

Mule and white-tailed deer

These regulations are intended to protect species of the deer family in the NWT (such as moose and caribou) from disease.

  • Hunters who shoot mule or white-tailed deer more than 100 km from the NWT border must have the animal tested for chronic wasting disease and provide proof the animal does not have the disease before bringing it into the NWT. Only boneless meat does not require testing.

Bats

These regulations are intended to protect bat species and their habitat (including at-risk species).

  • Naturally-occurring bat roosts may not be intentionally destroyed.
  • Destruction or removal of roosts may be authorized where required with a Wildlife General Permit, which can be obtained at no cost from ENR.

Raptors

These regulations are intended to protect birds of prey (raptors) and their habitat.

  • Raptor nests may not be intentionally destroyed, even if unoccupied.
  • Destruction or removal of nests may be authorized where required with a Wildlife General Permit, which can be obtained at no cost from ENR.

Wild pigs

These regulations are intended to protect NWT wildlife from disease and wildlife habitat from destruction.

  • Any pig (including wild boar, swine and hogs) outside an enclosure is considered a pest and may be killed by a Renewable Resource officer or hunter.
  • No hunting licence is required, but any person who harvests a wild pig must report it to their nearest ENR office within 72 hours.

Boreal caribou

These regulations are intended to conserve boreal caribou.

  • Resident Hunting Licence and General Hunting Licence holders require a tag to harvest boreal caribou.
  • The hunting season is limited to July 15-December 15.
  • Only bulls may be harvested.

Young harvesters

These regulations are intended to make it easier for non-resident young harvesters to go hunting.

  • Young harvesters (12 to 17 years old) from outside the NWT can now go hunting with a guide only, where previously they had to be accompanied by a licensed hunter and a licensed guide.

Wildlife Management and Monitoring Plans

These regulations are intended to reduce disturbance to wildlife and wildlife habitat from development projects.