Conservation Network Planning

FAQ - SOCNP Report

What is the NWT State of the Conservation Network Report 2016?

The Northwest Territories (NWT) State of the Conservation Network Report includes comprehensive data and information from best available sources, which is used to report on indicators and provide a baseline of comparison for future progress of the state of the conservation network in the NWT.

What does the report focus on?

This first State of the Conservation Network Report focuses solely on protected areas as criteria exist for protected areas and they are well defined in the NWT. As the NWT progresses with defining specific criteria for areas to be part of the conservation network, future reports will report on the conservation network as a whole.

How is the report organized?

The report has three sections. The first section covers the planning context in the NWT. The second section describes indicators used to assess the health of protected areas, which contributes to the stewardship section of the NWT State of the Environment Report. The third section outlines the benefits and opportunities gained from a conservation network. The Report concludes with next steps in reporting and where to find more information.

How does the report relate to overall GNWT plans for NWT conservation network planning?

The Government of the Northwest Territories  is collaboratively moving forward with developing and implementing a made-in-the-North approach to conservation network planning for the NWT.

This approach will improve upon the original NWT Protected Areas Strategy. It also will renew the commitment to conservation network planning and the development of a conservation network, including the use of ecological representation planning.

The NWT State of Conservation Network Report 2016 provides a baseline on the state of the conservation network in the NWT. It introduces terminology and concepts of conservation network planning, as well as gaps in information and in the conservation network that can be addressed by the new made-in-the-North approach to conservation network planning.